All Aboard! Onboarding and the Future of Organizational Socialization


    Worried about productivity? Fear company turnover?  You might want to consider onboarding, a form of organizational socialization that introduces new employees to the culture of a workplace. Through activities like meetings, get-togethers and lectures, onboarding provides new employees with a stable foundation to build their careers on. This has a tendency to increase productivity and fuel positive relationships between employees and their companies.

    Onboarding is enthused by many different factors, but divided into three primary ones: new employee characteristics, new employee behaviors and organizational efforts. This helps companies string together individual strengths that are compatible with organizational mores. Many companies use different socialization tactics that either nurture or challenge the employee, a good example of this would be the 1986 Jones’ Model, which builds on another model that identifies six sections that organizations can take to introduce socialization to a company. The Jones’ Model narrows those six dimensions into two categories that focus on institutional socialization and individual socialization. The institutional method focuses more on onboarding from within whereas the socialization model leaves the new employee to navigate on their own.

    While the results of onboarding are mostly positive, there have been doubts. One concern is that of “hand-holding” that could possibly distract an employee from their responsibilities. Onboarding is not for every company, as many adhere to more rigid ways of building productivity in new employees. But for the most part, onboarding has proven successful, and as with the rest of life, with the right amount of support, anyone can go above and beyond.