All Aboard! Onboarding and the Future of Organizational Socialization

 

    Worried about productivity? Fear company turnover?  You might want to consider onboarding, a form of organizational socialization that introduces new employees to the culture of a workplace. Through activities like meetings, get-togethers and lectures, onboarding provides new employees with a stable foundation to build their careers on. This has a tendency to increase productivity and fuel positive relationships between employees and their companies.

    Onboarding is enthused by many different factors, but divided into three primary ones: new employee characteristics, new employee behaviors and organizational efforts. This helps companies string together individual strengths that are compatible with organizational mores. Many companies use different socialization tactics that either nurture or challenge the employee, a good example of this would be the 1986 Jones’ Model, which builds on another model that identifies six sections that organizations can take to introduce socialization to a company. The Jones’ Model narrows those six dimensions into two categories that focus on institutional socialization and individual socialization. The institutional method focuses more on onboarding from within whereas the socialization model leaves the new employee to navigate on their own.

    While the results of onboarding are mostly positive, there have been doubts. One concern is that of “hand-holding” that could possibly distract an employee from their responsibilities. Onboarding is not for every company, as many adhere to more rigid ways of building productivity in new employees. But for the most part, onboarding has proven successful, and as with the rest of life, with the right amount of support, anyone can go above and beyond.

Leadership: The Good, the Bad and the Imperious

Despite what we might have been told (by others or ourselves), there is a leader in all of us just waiting to make an impact. The ability to lead is one of the most sought-after traits to have as a human being, for it demonstrates bravery, a clear vision and stability. But oftentimes, leadership can go to a dark place, and an ordinarily fair person can quickly become the opposite if they are not grounded in reality. In this post I’ll be looking at how leadership can go bad, and what people can do to regain the strength to be a positive leader.

After many years on the job, it is not uncommon for professionals in leadership positions to lose a sense of modesty. Perhaps this is due to the comfort level of professional consistency that they might have accomplished over the course of time. When a worker in power loses their sense of teamwork, cooperation becomes obsolete; thus creating a cycle of division and insufficiency in the workplace. This rubs off on their team members, who may see this behavior as healthy and normal, or “the way to move up.” Bennet Simonton, a leadership coach, explains “Bad leadership shuts off the natural creativity, innovation, and productivity of each employee and slowly but surely demotivates and demoralizes them. With the “I know better than you” and the “be quiet and listen to me” mentality often projected from management, the majority will act like robots waiting for instructions, even if that is not what management intended.”*

So how can problematic leaders take a turn for the best? The first step is to treat your so-called “subordinates” as equal players in the game of success. Listening to them and focusing on their strengths instead of their weaknesses is not as difficult as it seems when actively applied. Matching an employee’s personal strengths to responsibilities around the workplace makes for a huge success. Clear and concise planning free of haste shows a combination of accuracy and logical thinking. Strong problem solving, being proactive and brainstorming with team members are also excellent strengths to have. But more importantly, striving for success as fairly and efficiently as possible is a surefire way to becoming a prominent and productive team leader.

*Works Cited

Simonton, Bennett. “Good Leadership vs. Bad Leadership.” Web log post. Www.bensimonton.com. N.p., 2012. Web. 8 Aug. 2012.